USD to CHF Forecast: down to 0.889? Dollar to Franc ...

Former investment bank FX trader: Risk management part 3/3

Former investment bank FX trader: Risk management part 3/3
Welcome to the third and final part of this chapter.
Thank you all for the 100s of comments and upvotes - maybe this post will take us above 1,000 for this topic!
Keep any feedback or questions coming in the replies below.
Before you read this note, please start with Part I and then Part II so it hangs together and makes sense.
Part III
  • Squeezes and other risks
  • Market positioning
  • Bet correlation
  • Crap trades, timeouts and monthly limits

Squeezes and other risks

We are going to cover three common risks that traders face: events; squeezes, asymmetric bets.

Events

Economic releases can cause large short-term volatility. The most famous is Non Farm Payrolls, which is the most widely watched measure of US employment levels and affects the price of many instruments.On an NFP announcement currencies like EURUSD might jump (or drop) 100 pips no problem.
This is fine and there are trading strategies that one may employ around this but the key thing is to be aware of these releases.You can find economic calendars all over the internet - including on this site - and you need only check if there are any major releases each day or week.
For example, if you are trading off some intraday chart and scalping a few pips here and there it would be highly sensible to go into a known data release flat as it is pure coin-toss and not the reason for your trading. It only takes five minutes each day to plan for the day ahead so do not get caught out by this. Many retail traders get stopped out on such events when price volatility is at its peak.

Squeezes

Short squeezes bring a lot of danger and perhaps some opportunity.
The story of VW and Porsche is the best short squeeze ever. Throughout these articles we've used FX examples wherever possible but in this one instance the concept (which is also highly relevant in FX) is best illustrated with an historical lesson from a different asset class.
A short squeeze is when a participant ends up in a short position they are forced to cover. Especially when the rest of the market knows that this participant can be bullied into stopping out at terrible levels, provided the market can briefly drive the price into their pain zone.

There's a reason for the car, don't worry
Hedge funds had been shorting VW stock. However the amount of VW stock available to buy in the open market was actually quite limited. The local government owned a chunk and Porsche itself had bought and locked away around 30%. Neither of these would sell to the hedge-funds so a good amount of the stock was un-buyable at any price.
If you sell or short a stock you must be prepared to buy it back to go flat at some point.
To cut a long story short, Porsche bought a lot of call options on VW stock. These options gave them the right to purchase VW stock from banks at slightly above market price.
Eventually the banks who had sold these options realised there was no VW stock to go out and buy since the German government wouldn’t sell its allocation and Porsche wouldn’t either. If Porsche called in the options the banks were in trouble.
Porsche called in the options which forced the shorts to buy stock - at whatever price they could get it.
The price squeezed higher as those that were short got massively squeezed and stopped out. For one brief moment in 2008, VW was the world’s most valuable company. Shorts were burned hard.

Incredible event
Porsche apparently made $11.5 billion on the trade. The BBC described Porsche as “a hedge fund with a carmaker attached.”
If this all seems exotic then know that the same thing happens in FX all the time. If everyone in the market is talking about a key level in EURUSD being 1.2050 then you can bet the market will try to push through 1.2050 just to take out any short stops at that level. Whether it then rallies higher or fails and trades back lower is a different matter entirely.
This brings us on to the matter of crowded trades. We will look at positioning in more detail in the next section. Crowded trades are dangerous for PNL. If everyone believes EURUSD is going down and has already sold EURUSD then you run the risk of a short squeeze.
For additional selling to take place you need a very good reason for people to add to their position whereas a move in the other direction could force mass buying to cover their shorts.
A trading mentor when I worked at the investment bank once advised me:
Always think about which move would cause the maximum people the maximum pain. That move is precisely what you should be watching out for at all times.

Asymmetric losses

Also known as picking up pennies in front of a steamroller. This risk has caught out many a retail trader. Sometimes it is referred to as a "negative skew" strategy.
Ideally what you are looking for is asymmetric risk trade set-ups: that is where the downside is clearly defined and smaller than the upside. What you want to avoid is the opposite.
A famous example of this going wrong was the Swiss National Bank de-peg in 2012.
The Swiss National Bank had said they would defend the price of EURCHF so that it did not go below 1.2. Many people believed it could never go below 1.2 due to this. Many retail traders therefore opted for a strategy that some describe as ‘picking up pennies in front of a steam-roller’.
They would would buy EURCHF above the peg level and hope for a tiny rally of several pips before selling them back and keep doing this repeatedly. Often they were highly leveraged at 100:1 so that they could amplify the profit of the tiny 5-10 pip rally.
Then this happened.

Something that changed FX markets forever
The SNB suddenly did the unthinkable. They stopped defending the price. CHF jumped and so EURCHF (the number of CHF per 1 EUR) dropped to new lows very fast. Clearly, this trade had horrific risk : reward asymmetry: you risked 30% to make 0.05%.
Other strategies like naively selling options have the same result. You win a small amount of money each day and then spectacularly blow up at some point down the line.

Market positioning

We have talked about short squeezes. But how do you know what the market position is? And should you care?
Let’s start with the first. You should definitely care.
Let’s imagine the entire market is exceptionally long EURUSD and positioning reaches extreme levels. This makes EURUSD very vulnerable.
To keep the price going higher EURUSD needs to attract fresh buy orders. If everyone is already long and has no room to add, what can incentivise people to keep buying? The news flow might be good. They may believe EURUSD goes higher. But they have already bought and have their maximum position on.
On the flip side, if there’s an unexpected event and EURUSD gaps lower you will have the entire market trying to exit the position at the same time. Like a herd of cows running through a single doorway. Messy.
We are going to look at this in more detail in a later chapter, where we discuss ‘carry’ trades. For now this TRYJPY chart might provide some idea of what a rush to the exits of a crowded position looks like.

A carry trade position clear-out in action
Knowing if the market is currently at extreme levels of long or short can therefore be helpful.
The CFTC makes available a weekly report, which details the overall positions of speculative traders “Non Commercial Traders” in some of the major futures products. This includes futures tied to deliverable FX pairs such as EURUSD as well as products such as gold. The report is called “CFTC Commitments of Traders” ("COT").
This is a great benchmark. It is far more representative of the overall market than the proprietary ones offered by retail brokers as it covers a far larger cross-section of the institutional market.
Generally market participants will not pay a lot of attention to commercial hedgers, which are also detailed in the report. This data is worth tracking but these folks are simply hedging real-world transactions rather than speculating so their activity is far less revealing and far more noisy.
You can find the data online for free and download it directly here.

Raw format is kinda hard to work with

However, many websites will chart this for you free of charge and you may find it more convenient to look at it that way. Just google “CFTC positioning charts”.

But you can easily get visualisations
You can visually spot extreme positioning. It is extremely powerful.
Bear in mind the reports come out Friday afternoon US time and the report is a snapshot up to the prior Tuesday. That means it is a lagged report - by the time it is released it is a few days out of date. For longer term trades where you hold positions for weeks this is of course still pretty helpful information.
As well as the absolute level (is the speculative market net long or short) you can also use this to pick up on changes in positioning.
For example if bad news comes out how much does the net short increase? If good news comes out, the market may remain net short but how much did they buy back?
A lot of traders ask themselves “Does the market have this trade on?” The positioning data is a good method for answering this. It provides a good finger on the pulse of the wider market sentiment and activity.
For example you might say: “There was lots of noise about the good employment numbers in the US. However, there wasn’t actually a lot of position change on the back of it. Maybe everyone who wants to buy already has. What would happen now if bad news came out?”
In general traders will be wary of entering a crowded position because it will be hard to attract additional buyers or sellers and there could be an aggressive exit.
If you want to enter a trade that is showing extreme levels of positioning you must think carefully about this dynamic.

Bet correlation

Retail traders often drastically underestimate how correlated their bets are.
Through bitter experience, I have learned that a mistake in position correlation is the root of some of the most serious problems in trading. If you have eight highly correlated positions, then you are really trading one position that is eight times as large.
Bruce Kovner of hedge fund, Caxton Associates
For example, if you are trading a bunch of pairs against the USD you will end up with a simply huge USD exposure. A single USD-trigger can ruin all your bets. Your ideal scenario — and it isn’t always possible — would be to have a highly diversified portfolio of bets that do not move in tandem.
Look at this chart. Inverted USD index (DXY) is green. AUDUSD is orange. EURUSD is blue.

Chart from TradingView
So the whole thing is just one big USD trade! If you are long AUDUSD, long EURUSD, and short DXY you have three anti USD bets that are all likely to work or fail together.
The more diversified your portfolio of bets are, the more risk you can take on each.
There’s a really good video, explaining the benefits of diversification from Ray Dalio.
A systematic fund with access to an investable universe of 10,000 instruments has more opportunity to make a better risk-adjusted return than a trader who only focuses on three symbols. Diversification really is the closest thing to a free lunch in finance.
But let’s be pragmatic and realistic. Human retail traders don’t have capacity to run even one hundred bets at a time. More realistic would be an average of 2-3 trades on simultaneously. So what can be done?
For example:
  • You might diversify across time horizons by having a mix of short-term and long-term trades.
  • You might diversify across asset classes - trading some FX but also crypto and equities.
  • You might diversify your trade generation approach so you are not relying on the same indicators or drivers on each trade.
  • You might diversify your exposure to the market regime by having some trades that assume a trend will continue (momentum) and some that assume we will be range-bound (carry).
And so on. Basically you want to scan your portfolio of trades and make sure you are not putting all your eggs in one basket. If some trades underperform others will perform - assuming the bets are not correlated - and that way you can ensure your overall portfolio takes less risk per unit of return.
The key thing is to start thinking about a portfolio of bets and what each new trade offers to your existing portfolio of risk. Will it diversify or amplify a current exposure?

Crap trades, timeouts and monthly limits

One common mistake is to get bored and restless and put on crap trades. This just means trades in which you have low conviction.
It is perfectly fine not to trade. If you feel like you do not understand the market at a particular point, simply choose not to trade.
Flat is a position.
Do not waste your bullets on rubbish trades. Only enter a trade when you have carefully considered it from all angles and feel good about the risk. This will make it far easier to hold onto the trade if it moves against you at any point. You actually believe in it.
Equally, you need to set monthly limits. A standard limit might be a 10% account balance stop per month. At that point you close all your positions immediately and stop trading till next month.

Be strict with yourself and walk away
Let’s assume you started the year with $100k and made 5% in January so enter Feb with $105k balance. Your stop is therefore 10% of $105k or $10.5k . If your account balance dips to $94.5k ($105k-$10.5k) then you stop yourself out and don’t resume trading till March the first.
Having monthly calendar breaks is nice for another reason. Say you made a load of money in January. You don’t want to start February feeling you are up 5% or it is too tempting to avoid trading all month and protect the existing win. Each month and each year should feel like a clean slate and an independent period.
Everyone has trading slumps. It is perfectly normal. It will definitely happen to you at some stage. The trick is to take a break and refocus. Conserve your capital by not trading a lot whilst you are on a losing streak. This period will be much harder for you emotionally and you’ll end up making suboptimal decisions. An enforced break will help you see the bigger picture.
Put in place a process before you start trading and then it’ll be easy to follow and will feel much less emotional. Remember: the market doesn’t care if you win or lose, it is nothing personal.
When your head has cooled and you feel calm you return the next month and begin the task of building back your account balance.

That's a wrap on risk management

Thanks for taking time to read this three-part chapter on risk management. I hope you enjoyed it. Do comment in the replies if you have any questions or feedback.
Remember: the most important part of trading is not making money. It is not losing money. Always start with that principle. I hope these three notes have provided some food for thought on how you might approach risk management and are of practical use to you when trading. Avoiding mistakes is not a sexy tagline but it is an effective and reliable way to improve results.
Next up I will be writing about an exciting topic I think many traders should look at rather differently: news trading. Please follow on here to receive notifications and the broad outline is below.
News Trading Part I
  • Introduction
  • Why use the economic calendar
  • Reading the economic calendar
  • Knowing what's priced in
  • Surveys
  • Interest rates
  • First order thinking vs second order thinking
News Trading Part II
  • Preparing for quantitative and qualitative releases
  • Data surprise index
  • Using recent events to predict future reactions
  • Buy the rumour, sell the fact
  • The mysterious 'position trim' effect
  • Reversals
  • Some key FX releases
***

Disclaimer:This content is not investment advice and you should not place any reliance on it. The views expressed are the author's own and should not be attributed to any other person, including their employer.
submitted by getmrmarket to Forex [link] [comments]

H1 Backtest of ParallaxFX's BBStoch system

Disclaimer: None of this is financial advice. I have no idea what I'm doing. Please do your own research or you will certainly lose money. I'm not a statistician, data scientist, well-seasoned trader, or anything else that would qualify me to make statements such as the below with any weight behind them. Take them for the incoherent ramblings that they are.
TL;DR at the bottom for those not interested in the details.
This is a bit of a novel, sorry about that. It was mostly for getting my own thoughts organized, but if even one person reads the whole thing I will feel incredibly accomplished.

Background

For those of you not familiar, please see the various threads on this trading system here. I can't take credit for this system, all glory goes to ParallaxFX!
I wanted to see how effective this system was at H1 for a couple of reasons: 1) My current broker is TD Ameritrade - their Forex minimum is a mini lot, and I don't feel comfortable enough yet with the risk to trade mini lots on the higher timeframes(i.e. wider pip swings) that ParallaxFX's system uses, so I wanted to see if I could scale it down. 2) I'm fairly impatient, so I don't like to wait days and days with my capital tied up just to see if a trade is going to win or lose.
This does mean it requires more active attention since you are checking for setups once an hour instead of once a day or every 4-6 hours, but the upside is that you trade more often this way so you end up winning or losing faster and moving onto the next trade. Spread does eat more of the trade this way, but I'll cover this in my data below - it ends up not being a problem.
I looked at data from 6/11 to 7/3 on all pairs with a reasonable spread(pairs listed at bottom above the TL;DR). So this represents about 3-4 weeks' worth of trading. I used mark(mid) price charts. Spreadsheet link is below for anyone that's interested.

System Details

I'm pretty much using ParallaxFX's system textbook, but since there are a few options in his writeups, I'll include all the discretionary points here:

And now for the fun. Results!

As you can see, a higher target ended up with higher profit despite a much lower winrate. This is partially just how things work out with profit targets in general, but there's an additional point to consider in our case: the spread. Since we are trading on a lower timeframe, there is less overall price movement and thus the spread takes up a much larger percentage of the trade than it would if you were trading H4, Daily or Weekly charts. You can see exactly how much it accounts for each trade in my spreadsheet if you're interested. TDA does not have the best spreads, so you could probably improve these results with another broker.
EDIT: I grabbed typical spreads from other brokers, and turns out while TDA is pretty competitive on majors, their minors/crosses are awful! IG beats them by 20-40% and Oanda beats them 30-60%! Using IG spreads for calculations increased profits considerably (another 5% on top) and Oanda spreads increased profits massively (another 15%!). Definitely going to be considering another broker than TDA for this strategy. Plus that'll allow me to trade micro-lots, so I can be more granular(and thus accurate) with my position sizing and compounding.

A Note on Spread

As you can see in the data, there were scenarios where the spread was 80% of the overall size of the trade(the size of the confirmation candle that you draw your fibonacci retracements over), which would obviously cut heavily into your profits.
Removing any trades where the spread is more than 50% of the trade width improved profits slightly without removing many trades, but this is almost certainly just coincidence on a small sample size. Going below 40% and even down to 30% starts to cut out a lot of trades for the less-common pairs, but doesn't actually change overall profits at all(~1% either way).
However, digging all the way down to 25% starts to really make some movement. Profit at the -161.8% TP level jumps up to 37.94% if you filter out anything with a spread that is more than 25% of the trade width! And this even keeps the sample size fairly large at 187 total trades.
You can get your profits all the way up to 48.43% at the -161.8% TP level if you filter all the way down to only trades where spread is less than 15% of the trade width, however your sample size gets much smaller at that point(108 trades) so I'm not sure I would trust that as being accurate in the long term.
Overall based on this data, I'm going to only take trades where the spread is less than 25% of the trade width. This may bias my trades more towards the majors, which would mean a lot more correlated trades as well(more on correlation below), but I think it is a reasonable precaution regardless.

Time of Day

Time of day had an interesting effect on trades. In a totally predictable fashion, a vast majority of setups occurred during the London and New York sessions: 5am-12pm Eastern. However, there was one outlier where there were many setups on the 11PM bar - and the winrate was about the same as the big hours in the London session. No idea why this hour in particular - anyone have any insight? That's smack in the middle of the Tokyo/Sydney overlap, not at the open or close of either.
On many of the hour slices I have a feeling I'm just dealing with small number statistics here since I didn't have a lot of data when breaking it down by individual hours. But here it is anyway - for all TP levels, these three things showed up(all in Eastern time):
I don't have any reason to think these timeframes would maintain this behavior over the long term. They're almost certainly meaningless. EDIT: When you de-dup highly correlated trades, the number of trades in these timeframes really drops, so from this data there is no reason to think these timeframes would be any different than any others in terms of winrate.
That being said, these time frames work out for me pretty well because I typically sleep 12am-7am Eastern time. So I automatically avoid the 5am-6am timeframe, and I'm awake for the majority of this system's setups.

Moving stops up to breakeven

This section goes against everything I know and have ever heard about trade management. Please someone find something wrong with my data. I'd love for someone to check my formulas, but I realize that's a pretty insane time commitment to ask of a bunch of strangers.
Anyways. What I found was that for these trades moving stops up...basically at all...actually reduced the overall profitability.
One of the data points I collected while charting was where the price retraced back to after hitting a certain milestone. i.e. once the price hit the -61.8% profit level, how far back did it retrace before hitting the -100% profit level(if at all)? And same goes for the -100% profit level - how far back did it retrace before hitting the -161.8% profit level(if at all)?
Well, some complex excel formulas later and here's what the results appear to be. Emphasis on appears because I honestly don't believe it. I must have done something wrong here, but I've gone over it a hundred times and I can't find anything out of place.
Now, you might think exactly what I did when looking at these numbers: oof, the spread killed us there right? Because even when you move your SL to 0%, you still end up paying the spread, so it's not truly "breakeven". And because we are trading on a lower timeframe, the spread can be pretty hefty right?
Well even when I manually modified the data so that the spread wasn't subtracted(i.e. "Breakeven" was truly +/- 0), things don't look a whole lot better, and still way worse than the passive trade management method of leaving your stops in place and letting it run. And that isn't even a realistic scenario because to adjust out the spread you'd have to move your stoploss inside the candle edge by at least the spread amount, meaning it would almost certainly be triggered more often than in the data I collected(which was purely based on the fib levels and mark price). Regardless, here are the numbers for that scenario:
From a literal standpoint, what I see behind this behavior is that 44 of the 69 breakeven trades(65%!) ended up being profitable to -100% after retracing deeply(but not to the original SL level), which greatly helped offset the purely losing trades better than the partial profit taken at -61.8%. And 36 went all the way back to -161.8% after a deep retracement without hitting the original SL. Anyone have any insight into this? Is this a problem with just not enough data? It seems like enough trades that a pattern should emerge, but again I'm no expert.
I also briefly looked at moving stops to other lower levels (78.6%, 61.8%, 50%, 38.2%, 23.6%), but that didn't improve things any. No hard data to share as I only took a quick look - and I still might have done something wrong overall.
The data is there to infer other strategies if anyone would like to dig in deep(more explanation on the spreadsheet below). I didn't do other combinations because the formulas got pretty complicated and I had already answered all the questions I was looking to answer.

2-Candle vs Confirmation Candle Stops

Another interesting point is that the original system has the SL level(for stop entries) just at the outer edge of the 2-candle pattern that makes up the system. Out of pure laziness, I set up my stops just based on the confirmation candle. And as it turns out, that is much a much better way to go about it.
Of the 60 purely losing trades, only 9 of them(15%) would go on to be winners with stops on the 2-candle formation. Certainly not enough to justify the extra loss and/or reduced profits you are exposing yourself to in every single other trade by setting a wider SL.
Oddly, in every single scenario where the wider stop did save the trade, it ended up going all the way to the -161.8% profit level. Still, not nearly worth it.

Correlated Trades

As I've said many times now, I'm really not qualified to be doing an analysis like this. This section in particular.
Looking at shared currency among the pairs traded, 74 of the trades are correlated. Quite a large group, but it makes sense considering the sort of moves we're looking for with this system.
This means you are opening yourself up to more risk if you were to trade on every signal since you are technically trading with the same underlying sentiment on each different pair. For example, GBP/USD and AUD/USD moving together almost certainly means it's due to USD moving both pairs, rather than GBP and AUD both moving the same size and direction coincidentally at the same time. So if you were to trade both signals, you would very likely win or lose both trades - meaning you are actually risking double what you'd normally risk(unless you halve both positions which can be a good option, and is discussed in ParallaxFX's posts and in various other places that go over pair correlation. I won't go into detail about those strategies here).
Interestingly though, 17 of those apparently correlated trades ended up with different wins/losses.
Also, looking only at trades that were correlated, winrate is 83%/70%/55% (for the three TP levels).
Does this give some indication that the same signal on multiple pairs means the signal is stronger? That there's some strong underlying sentiment driving it? Or is it just a matter of too small a sample size? The winrate isn't really much higher than the overall winrates, so that makes me doubt it is statistically significant.
One more funny tidbit: EUCAD netted the lowest overall winrate: 30% to even the -61.8% TP level on 10 trades. Seems like that is just a coincidence and not enough data, but dang that's a sucky losing streak.
EDIT: WOW I spent some time removing correlated trades manually and it changed the results quite a bit. Some thoughts on this below the results. These numbers also include the other "What I will trade" filters. I added a new worksheet to my data to show what I ended up picking.
To do this, I removed correlated trades - typically by choosing those whose spread had a lower % of the trade width since that's objective and something I can see ahead of time. Obviously I'd like to only keep the winning trades, but I won't know that during the trade. This did reduce the overall sample size down to a level that I wouldn't otherwise consider to be big enough, but since the results are generally consistent with the overall dataset, I'm not going to worry about it too much.
I may also use more discretionary methods(support/resistance, quality of indecision/confirmation candles, news/sentiment for the pairs involved, etc) to filter out correlated trades in the future. But as I've said before I'm going for a pretty mechanical system.
This brought the 3 TP levels and even the breakeven strategies much closer together in overall profit. It muted the profit from the high R:R strategies and boosted the profit from the low R:R strategies. This tells me pair correlation was skewing my data quite a bit, so I'm glad I dug in a little deeper. Fortunately my original conclusion to use the -161.8 TP level with static stops is still the winner by a good bit, so it doesn't end up changing my actions.
There were a few times where MANY (6-8) correlated pairs all came up at the same time, so it'd be a crapshoot to an extent. And the data showed this - often then won/lost together, but sometimes they did not. As an arbitrary rule, the more correlations, the more trades I did end up taking(and thus risking). For example if there were 3-5 correlations, I might take the 2 "best" trades given my criteria above. 5+ setups and I might take the best 3 trades, even if the pairs are somewhat correlated.
I have no true data to back this up, but to illustrate using one example: if AUD/JPY, AUD/USD, CAD/JPY, USD/CAD all set up at the same time (as they did, along with a few other pairs on 6/19/20 9:00 AM), can you really say that those are all the same underlying movement? There are correlations between the different correlations, and trying to filter for that seems rough. Although maybe this is a known thing, I'm still pretty green to Forex - someone please enlighten me if so! I might have to look into this more statistically, but it would be pretty complex to analyze quantitatively, so for now I'm going with my gut and just taking a few of the "best" trades out of the handful.
Overall, I'm really glad I went further on this. The boosting of the B/E strategies makes me trust my calculations on those more since they aren't so far from the passive management like they were with the raw data, and that really had me wondering what I did wrong.

What I will trade

Putting all this together, I am going to attempt to trade the following(demo for a bit to make sure I have the hang of it, then for keeps):
Looking at the data for these rules, test results are:
I'll be sure to let everyone know how it goes!

Other Technical Details

Raw Data

Here's the spreadsheet for anyone that'd like it. (EDIT: Updated some of the setups from the last few days that have fully played out now. I also noticed a few typos, but nothing major that would change the overall outcomes. Regardless, I am currently reviewing every trade to ensure they are accurate.UPDATE: Finally all done. Very few corrections, no change to results.)
I have some explanatory notes below to help everyone else understand the spiraled labyrinth of a mind that put the spreadsheet together.

Insanely detailed spreadsheet notes

For you real nerds out there. Here's an explanation of what each column means:

Pairs

  1. AUD/CAD
  2. AUD/CHF
  3. AUD/JPY
  4. AUD/NZD
  5. AUD/USD
  6. CAD/CHF
  7. CAD/JPY
  8. CHF/JPY
  9. EUAUD
  10. EUCAD
  11. EUCHF
  12. EUGBP
  13. EUJPY
  14. EUNZD
  15. EUUSD
  16. GBP/AUD
  17. GBP/CAD
  18. GBP/CHF
  19. GBP/JPY
  20. GBP/NZD
  21. GBP/USD
  22. NZD/CAD
  23. NZD/CHF
  24. NZD/JPY
  25. NZD/USD
  26. USD/CAD
  27. USD/CHF
  28. USD/JPY

TL;DR

Based on the reasonable rules I discovered in this backtest:

Demo Trading Results

Since this post, I started demo trading this system assuming a 5k capital base and risking ~1% per trade. I've added the details to my spreadsheet for anyone interested. The results are pretty similar to the backtest when you consider real-life conditions/timing are a bit different. I missed some trades due to life(work, out of the house, etc), so that brought my total # of trades and thus overall profit down, but the winrate is nearly identical. I also closed a few trades early due to various reasons(not liking the price action, seeing support/resistance emerge, etc).
A quick note is that TD's paper trade system fills at the mid price for both stop and limit orders, so I had to subtract the spread from the raw trade values to get the true profit/loss amount for each trade.
I'm heading out of town next week, then after that it'll be time to take this sucker live!

Live Trading Results

I started live-trading this system on 8/10, and almost immediately had a string of losses much longer than either my backtest or demo period. Murphy's law huh? Anyways, that has me spooked so I'm doing a longer backtest before I start risking more real money. It's going to take me a little while due to the volume of trades, but I'll likely make a new post once I feel comfortable with that and start live trading again.
submitted by ForexBorex to Forex [link] [comments]

The GBP is the strongest and the EUR is the weakest as NA traders enter

The GBP is the strongest and the EUR is the weakest as NA traders enter. The GBP is the strongest, but the gains are relatively modest. THe USD is mixed in the morning snapshot with the greenback higher vs the EUR, JPY, CHF, CAD and down vs the GBP and AUD. It is unchanged vs the NZD. The volatility is down in the forex market. Each of the major currency pairs and crosses are trading well below their 22 day averages. The JPY pairs moved lower earlier in the day, but have rebounded with the GBPJPY leading the way (up 55 pips). The USDCAD has given up earlier gains and trades back toward unchanged on the day (up 14 pips after being up around 90 pips at the high)
submitted by Nelvid to Forex [link] [comments]

Recession Imminent

Introducing the newest brand of full-blown autism™, I present to you the California / Europe ultimate bear portfolio! Based on a special blend of my extra chromosomes and a spicy mix of hate for California, this portfolio will blow average market returns out of the water based on the following assumptions (Cetaris Paribus):
  1. The world will enter a large economic recession within the next 12 months.
  2. Many Currency values will fall relative to others, however the Euro will be hit among the hardest.
  3. As unprofitable companies no longer have access to liquid credit or financing they will have to restructure their debt in some form.
  4. The highest density of unprofitable companies will continue to exist in California, and local California municipalities will not plan accordingly for a recession.
  5. European markets in general will fall quicker and with more momentum than US equity markets.
Feedback and thoughts requested please.

Symbol & Exchange Description Instrument Position Strategy Allocation (%)
CHF/EUR FOREX ICE Swiss Frank vs Euro Currency Pair Currency Pair Long 10
6EH2021 CME Euro Futures March 2021 Futures Contract Short 10
FXE NYSEARCA Invesco Currency Shares Euro Currency ETF ETF 15JAN 2021 $98 Strike Put Contract Long 10
GBP/EUR FOREX ICE Pound Sterling vs Euro Currency Pair Currency Pair Long 15
USD/EUR FOREX ICE U.S. Dollar vs Euro Currency Pair Currency Pair Long 5
CMF NYSEARCA California Municipal Bond ETF ETF Short 5
PZA NYSEARCA Invesco Nation AMT-Free Muni Bond ETF ETF Short 5
AUD/USD FOREX OANDA Australian Dollar vs U.S. Dollar Currency Pair Currency Pair Long 5
EZU BATS iShares MSCI Eurozone ETF ETF 15MAY2020 $37 Strike Put Contract Long 15
GDX NYSEARCA VanEck Vectors Gold Miners ETF ETF 15JAN2021 $35 Strike Call Contract Long 20
Edit: Typo, wrote put instead of call for GDX. Shame tables don't copy over from word / excel and you have to retype yourself.
submitted by chaney3 to wallstreetbets [link] [comments]

What happens to stocks trading on foreign exchanges when there is a US IPO (LEVI LVISF BABA.US BABA.SW)

I was researching the upcoming Levi's IPO and noticed that their Japanese counterpart Levi's Japan KK trades on the Nikkei. I am not sure what the ownership relationship is between the two, but Levi's Japan says that they are "licensing" Levi's apparel for sale in Japan. They have been around since 1982 and report 14.5B USD revenue. Its price went from 2.6 to 10 in May 2018, but I can't find any source to tell me if that was due to buyback, merger, reverse split, or other reason.
My question is what typically happens to stocks like this once the US company IPO's or has other big changes in valuation?
I also looked at the Swiss SIX traded Alibaba stock vs. NYSE, and the swiss version has 13 % points better 5 year returns, after accounting for 13.5% gain of the CHF vs USD. This overperformance tended to hold when looking at other timeframes.
I don't know a ton about forex or how monetary policy affects securities besides basics, but can anyone comment on the price behavior and possibility for arbitrage?
submitted by bb_nyc to stocks [link] [comments]

Established Strategies You Can Use In Forex Trading

Both down market and up market patterns are visible, but one is more dominant. You should aim to select the trades based on the trends.

Adjust your position each time you open up a new trade, based on the charts you're studying. Traders often open in the same position and spend more than they should or not a sufficient amount. Vary your position depending on the trades above you if you want to be profitable in the market.

Some currency pairs have what is called an inverse relationship with another currency pair. What this means is that when one pair is trending upwards, the other trends downward (and vice-versa). The classic example is that of the EUUSD vs. the USD/CHF. This comes about because the Swiss economy is closely tied with the rest of the European economy. Additionally, there is the common factor of the US dollar in both pairs.

If you are just starting out in Forex and you are still hesitant about investing your own money, sign up for a demo account with a broker that will enable you to try out your Forex investment skills. Demo accounts allow you to trade with virtual money. It is a great way for you to practice without risking any real money.

You should try Forex trading without the pressure of real money. By practicing live trading under real market conditions, you can get a feel for the Forex market without using actual currency. You can also get some excellent trading advice through online tutorials. Gather as much information as you can, and practice a lot of trading with your demo account, before you move on to trading with money.

It may seem like it is you against the world sometimes when it comes to dealing with Forex trading. With the vast amount of information available online, it can be nearly overwhelming at first. This article will provide much helpful information for you to get started on the right path.

Begin as a Forex trader by setting attainable goals and sticking with those goals. Establishing goals, and deadlines for meeting those goals, is extremely important when you're trading in Forex. Keep in mind that the timetable you create should have room for error. If this is your first-time trading, you will probably make mistakes. Additionally, calculate a realistic amount of time that you can spend trading, and make sure to factor in time spent researching.

You should pay attention to the larger time frames above the one-hour chart. Technology can even allow you to track Forex down to 15-minute intervals. The thing is that fluctuations occur all the time and it's sometimes random luck what happens. You do not need stress in your life, stay with long cycles.

Be sure that you always open up in a different position based on the market. There are Forex traders who always open using the same position. They often end up committing more cash than they intended and don't have enough money. Learn to adjust your trading accordingly for any chance of success.

Learning about the currency pair you choose is important. It can take a long time to learn different pairs, so don't hold up your trading education by waiting until you learn every single pair. It's better to pick a pair in which you are interested, do your research, and understand how volatile the pair is. Follow and news reports and take a look at forecasting for your currency pair.

As a beginner in Forex, you will need to determine what time frames you will prefer trading in. To make plans for getting in and out of trades quickly, rely on the 15-minute and hourly charts to plan your entry and exit points. A scalper, for example, might refer to the five- and ten-minute charts to complete trades within a matter of minutes.

Utilize resources at hand, such as exchange market signals, to facilitate purchases or sell-outs. Forex Robots Software allows you to set alerts that sound once the market reaches a certain rate. Figure out your exit and entry points ahead of time to avoid losing time to decision-making.

Many traders make careless decisions when they start making money based upon greed and excitement. Consequently, not having enough confidence can also cause you to lose money. Work hard to maintain control of your emotions and only act once you have all of the facts - never act based on your feelings.

If you are new to the trading market, you should begin your account with a small initial deposit. This minimizes your losses if you were to lose your money. Instead of depositing more money, you should try to make gains through the money that you initially invested, and then place the money into further investments.

Be sure that your account has a Stop-loss in place. Stop-losses are like free insurance for your trading. If you do not set up any type of Stop-loss order, and there happens to be a large move that was not expected, you can wind up losing quite a bit of money. Your capital can be preserved with Stop-loss orders.
submitted by forexrobotspro to u/forexrobotspro [link] [comments]

Technical Analysis Weekly Review: 6. A Trading Plan, Part 1

Technical Analysis Weekly Review by ClydeMachine

Previous Week's Post:
5. Momentum & Volatility
This Week:
6. A Trading Plan, Part 1
Next Week's Post:
7. A Trading Plan, Part 2

6. A Trading Plan TL;DR


6. A Trading Plan

So you've been following TAWR for the last month - what does your trading plan look like? If you haven't started one yet, that's okay - that's what we start to cover in this week's post. First, you need to do a little soul searching.

Is this the right market for you to trade in?

Unlike other markets, the Bitcoin market does not close, not even on weekends. (International exchanges are for the most part open 6 days out of 7. BTC is around the clock.) This means there is constantly something happening, something to be watching for. Obviously you needn't be watching charts all the time and losing sleep and cuddle time because of a possible overseas news bit making waves - but this does open the market up for a lot of activity and this can be a serious stressor. If this will be too much for you, don't worry! This isn't the only market you can trade in. If this is a serious concern for you, consider other markets on the Forex. There are plenty of currency pairs to trade in that aren't nearly as crazy as those involving XBTs.
...If you're still here and not looking up USD/CHF market behaviour, that must mean you like rollercoasters.

Type of Trader: Being Honest With Yourself

Are you a swing trader? Long-term buy-and-holder looking to make a little extra in the short-term? Just curious what it's like to do what a daytrader does? Answering the question of "what type of trader are you" is important when setting up a trading plan, because certain indicators are better suited to different styles of trading. Your trading style will not necessarily reflect mine. Yours will likely differ a lot from mine and everyone else' - but as long as you can make decisions based off of that plan, and they make you money when followed, it is a good trading plan.
Ultimately, the goal of answering that question isn't to give yourself a label, it's to find a set of technical rules that you can follow that 1) make you money, and 2) that you can actually act on. Trader indecisiveness is a serious problem when on the (digital) trading floor. If you have a killer plan that seems like it'll work well for you based on the backtesting, but you find that you can't actually decide when to enter and exit a position because it's reacting very sensitive to market movements, that's trader indecisiveness. Suppose it's not reactive enough and you miss entry points every time they pass? That's also trader indecision. If you can take action based on the indicators, and make money as a result, that's a good plan. If not, go ahead and make revisions to the plan. Identify what's causing your money to disappear into fees and other traders' pockets, and make changes to keep that from happening!
I mentioned backtesting. That's important because whenever you come up with (or change) a trading plan, you need to...

PAPER TRADE FIRST.

If you aren't making money on paper, why would you make money in the market?
To paper trade, take down your actions based on your prospective trading plan, using actual market data. Follow the market and see if your trades would have made money if you had actually executed them on the market. If you're making satisfying gains consistently on those trades based on the rules of your plan, you can have confidence in your trading plan. If you're losing money or just barely breaking even, consider revisions to your trading plan. You can use historical data to check your plan's profitability, since it's readily available. Bitcoincharts.com and Tradingview.com both let you see historical data from the Bitcoin market, for example.
Obviously this will not be terribly useful to you until you've built your plan, but if you've already started to play with some indicators just to get a feel of how they look and react with the data, you'll find those two links somewhat helpful in getting a jump on next week's post.

Stick to the Facts.

Maybe your gut has never done you wrong, but always follow the chart. Befriend the trend. Trust the chart. Facts don't lie. Evidence doesn't lie. Make money by going with the market, not against it, no matter what your emotions or feelings are telling you.
This is something I've been guilty of, because the fact is I love Bitcoin. I really do. I love its functionality, its widespread growth, and the fact that it's techy at its decentralized heart. (That's a paradox, by the way.) But when a trader gets too involved with their chosen security, they believe in it for the wrong reasons. As much as I love Bitcoin, I have to sell it if the price goes into a mad nosedive. If you believe in the long-term success of Bitcoin, cool - know why you believe in it. Otherwise, just trade it and don't get too attached to it.
One of the key differences between Bitcoin and traditional stocks are that stocks are not food or clothes - you can't eat or wear stocks, so selling them is how you make money (locking in profits vs making gains "on paper"). However, Bitcoin actually does have use. It can be spent like any other currency (except faster!) and therefore having a lot of this security actually does give you a function you might not otherwise have. All the same, decide just how close you want to be to Bitcoin. If you believe it'll always and forever have a value, and will increase in value over time no matter what, then go ahead and collect as many as you can afford. If you have your cautious doubts, be aware of the previous point about getting too close to the security, and trade it like any other stock.
It's all about making money, whether you measure your monetary gains in USD or XBTs.
This next segment is right out of Barbara Rockefeller's "Technical Analysis for Dummies, 2nd ed." book, and is always true whether you're into cryptocurrencies or traditional stocks.

Diversify

"Diversification reduces risk. The proof of the concept in financial math won its proponents the Nobel prize, but the old adage has been around for centuries: “Don’t put all your eggs in one basket.” In technical trading, diversification applies in two places:

Deciding on Indicators

Wait til next week and we'll go over those! We'll see which ones fit with faster or slower trading plans (both are useful in Bitcoin) and you get to branch off from there and build your plan accordingly.

Next Week:

I'll welcome redditors to either comment or PM me their trading plans I'll do my best to look them over and offer suggestions or warnings as I see them. Again, I'm no guru or all-knowing being, and I'm not a certified trader or money manager or anything of that nature - but I'll offer the benefit of my research over the last few months regarding the indicators we've covered.
Stay curious, make money, have fun and see you next week.
submitted by ClydeMachine to BitcoinMarkets [link] [comments]

Forex Technical Analysis: AUD.USD Forex Technical Analysis: USD.CHF How to trade GBP/USD (Cable): Tips & Tricks - YouTube Forex Technical Analysis: EUR.CHF FOREX TRADING USD CHF United States VS Swiss Franc 6th Nov ... Forex Technical Analysis: AUD.USD How Gold Affects AUD/USD and USD/CHF 🔗 - YouTube USD? CHF? EUR? Währungen in der TWS wechseln! EUR/USD and GBP/USD Forecast July 9, 2019 USD vs CHF Live C Clamp Trade 12 7 16

Want to send money from CHF to USD? Try XE Money Transfer now. Fast. Secure. No fees* Sign Up *Charges may occasionally be applied by a third party bank when transferring the funds to XE Money Transfer or before the funds arrive in the recipient account. Gráfico de CHF a USD. 4 Nov 2019 00:00 UTC - 2 Nov 2020 19:42 UTC . CHF/USD close:1.09017 low:0.99980 high:1.10779 . Ver gráfico completo ... About CHF USD Chart & Technical Analysis. The Swiss Franc and US Dollar are a cross rate of two of financial heavy weights. This CHF USD forex chart is real time, live 24 hours per day, Monday to Friday. It's a useful rate for those looking to exchange currencies between Switzerland and the United States. Learn more on Forex.. At Walletinvestor.com we predict future values with technical analysis for wide selection of Forex currency pairs like CHF/USD. If you are looking for Forex pairs with good return, CHFUSD can be a profitable investment option. CHF/USD rate equal to 1.096 at 2020-11-10 (today's range: 1.094 - 1.097). Based on our forecasts, a long-term increase ... According to our Forecast System, USD to CHF Forex pair is a bad long-term (1-year) investment*. "United States Dollar / Swiss Franc" exchange rate predictions are updated every 5 minutes with latest Forex (Foreign Exchange) rates by smart technical market analysis. USD/CHF Overview The Swiss franc, often used under the signs (Fr.), (SFr.) and (FS), under the code CHF or simply referred to as Swissy. The franc is the fifth most traded currency in the Forex ... This USD/CHF Chart lets you see this pair's currency rate history for up to 10 years! XE uses highly accurate, live mid-market rates. USD to CHF Chart. 30 Oct 2020 01:20 UTC - 31 Oct 2020 01:20 UTC. USD/CHF close:0.91740 low:0.91387 high:0.91778 Convert. Need a cash payout option? With cash payout to over 100 countries, our sister company can help. Try Ria Money Transfer Get a currency data ... Chf vs usd exchange rate. 13 May. 2018 19:48. The SWISS FRANC (CHF) The official currency of Switzerland is the Swiss Franc with the sign (Fr.) Or (SFr.)with the code (CHF). The CHF is the legal tender of Switzerland, Liechtenstein, and Italian, the Swiss National Bank (SNB) issues banknotes and the Swiss Mint issues the coins in the European countries. The currencies show often the Swiss ...

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Forex Technical Analysis: AUD.USD

Correlation between the Gold Price and AUD/USD and USD/CHF http://www.financial-spread-betting.com/academy/gold-spread-betting.html PLEASE LIKE AND SHARE THI... ★ How to trade GBP/USD i.e. cable, Tips & Tricks ★ You can trade the GBP/USD at Ayondo http://www.financial-spread-betting.com/spreadbetting/Ayondo-compare.h... FOREX Buy and Sell Alert Dashboard - AUD CAD CHF EUR GBP JPY NZD USD XAU Market Stream TV 5 watching Live now How Gold Affects AUD/USD and USD/CHF 🔗 - Duration: 4:48. How to trade Forex: US Dollar vs. Swiss Franc Enter code: FXG20 for 20% off your first month at www.forexgentleman.com Visit www.forexgentleman.com to join for free with a 7 day free trial! How to trade Forex: Euro vs. Swiss Franc This signal was sent to Team FXG on May 15th 2019 Visit www.forexgentleman.com to join for free with a 7 day free tr... How to trade Forex: Australian Dollar vs. US Dollar This signal was sent to Team FXG on February 25th 2019 Visit www.forexgentleman.com to join for free with a 7 day free trial! This video is a update of the last video posted. Here I show a live Ichimoku C-Clamp trade on the USD vs CHF. You can learn more about trading Ichimoku on my site at www.fxatoneglance.com. EUR/USD Technical Analysis for July 10, 2019 by FXEmpire - Duration: 1:25. ... Weekly Forex Forecast for EURUSD, GBPUSD, AUDUSD, NZDUSD, AUDJPY (December 9 - 13, 2019) - Duration: 12:15. Justin ... Strategy Method Video ( https://youtu.be/ONEzSeViXB8 ) فيديو شرح الإستراتيجية This channel provides a recording of trades in the trading markets ... In diesem Praxisvideo zur TWS zeigen wir euch die Übersicht der verschiedenen Währungen in eurem Depot und wie ihr diese wechseln könnt. Euer Max Unser Grundlagen-Seminar Optionen: https://bit ...

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